italian dual citizenship: what is jure sanguinis?

Any biological child born to a mother and/or father of Italian citizenship is entitled to Italian citizenship. A child born to an Italian mother, and non-Italian father are only entitled to Italian citizenship if the child was born after January 1, 1948.

If you were born in the United States you may also be considered an Italian citizen if any one of the following situations pertains to you:

Scenario #1: Your father or your mother (if you were born after January 1,1948) was an Italian citizen at the time of your birth and he/she never renounced his/her Italian citizenship. In this case you must provide the following documents:

  1. Birth certificate of father or mother (and death certificate if applicable) 
  2. Marriage certificate of parents 
  3. If applicable, Naturalization certificate of father or mother or letter from INS (Immigration Office) certifying the parent did not become a naturalized US citizen. In the event that naturalization of a parent did occur, the naturalized must have occurred AFTER the child’s birth to qualify for Italian citizenship.

 

Scenario #2: Your grandfather or your grandmother (if either your mother or father was born after January 1, 1948) was an Italian citizen at the time of your parent’s birth. Neither you nor your Italian parent ever renounced your Italian citizenship. In this case you must provide the following documents:

  1. Birth certificate of grandfather or grandmother (and death certificate if applicable)
  2. Marriage certificate of grandparents
  3. If applicable, Naturalization certificate of grandfather or grandmother or letter from INS (Immigration Office) certifying that the grandparent did not become a naturalized US citizen. In the event that naturalization of a grandparent did occur, the naturalization must have occurred AFTER the child’s birth (your parent) to qualify for Italian citizenship.

 

Scenario #3: Your great-grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of your grandfather’s birth. Neither you, your parents or grandparents ever renounced Italian citizenship. In this case you must provide the following documents:

  1. Birth and death certificates of great-grandfather 
  2. Marriage certificate of great-grandparents 
  3. Birth certificate of grandfather or grandmother (and death certificate if applicable) 
  4. Marriage certificate of grandparents 
  5. If applicable, Naturalization certificate of great-grandfather or letter from INS (Immigration Office) certifying the great-grandfather did not become a naturalized US citizen. In the event that naturalization of the great-grandfather did occur, the naturalization must have occurred AFTER the child’s birth (your grandparent) to qualify for Italian citizenship 
  6. Birth certificate of father or mother (and death certificate if applicable) 
  7. Marriage certificate of parents

 

The applicant must also present the following personal documents:
  1. Birth certificate
  2. Divorce decree, if applicable
  3. Birth certificates for the applicant’s minor children, if applicable
GENERAL RULES
  • The applicant must PERSONALLY appear at the offices of the Consulate General with a valid photo ID (passport, driver’s license, etc.) to request Italian citizenship.
  • The letter attesting that the person in question was not a naturalized US citizen up to and including the applicant’s date of birth, must be issued by Homeland Security Immigration & Naturalization Services at: 423 I Street, NW, Washington, DC 20536
  • All documents must be in original or certified copy and will not be returned to the applicant - (see attached instructions on how to request and present vital statistic documents).
  • All certified copies of divorce decrees must be presented with the Italian translation – (see attached instructions on how to request and present divorce decrees).
  • All certified death certificates, complete with apostilles, must be presented for all members of each preceding generation who are deceased.
  • Except for Naturalization Certificates, all documents issued in the United States must be affixed with the appropriate “Apostille” from the issuing State – see attached list for the addresses of the Secretaries of State, located within the jurisdiction of this Consulate General.